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Fernão Mendes Pinto

Belmonte Suite

Former residence of a noble family dating back to 1449, the hotel has sitting rooms like no other: More than 3,800 blue-and-white Portuguese tiles from the 1700’s cover the walls, complemented by dreamy fado music. I felt as if we had the entire palace to ourselves, as though we were breathing in living history of those walls.

C.F. – CONDÉ NAST TRAVELER “GOLD LIST 2015: TOP HOTELS IN THE WORLD”

About the Suite

Our smallest but beautiful with a stunning river view, and perfect for the adult children. The bedroom with high ceilings has the bed draped in luminous yellow pure silk, a cozy antechamber and a light green marble bathroom. Area 29 sqm.

Beds: Double bed
Occupancy: 2 guests
Size: 29 sqm
View: City, Alfama bairro, River.

Price: 550,00€/night with complementary breakfast and VAT included (City tax – 1€/person/day not included).
Special holidays: S. Valentines, Easter and Christmas holidays an extra cost of 100€ per suite will be applied.

Who was Fernão Mendes Pinto

Fernão Mendes Pinto (c.1509 – 8 July 1583) was a Portuguese explorer and writer. His voyages are recorded in Pilgrimage (Portuguese: Peregrinação) (1614), his autobiographical memoir. The historical accuracy of the work is debatable due to the many events which seem far fetched or at least exaggerated. Some aspects of the work can be verified, particularly through Pinto’s service to the Portuguese Crown and by his association with Jesuit missionaries.

Fernão Mendes Pinto was born in Montemor-o-Velho, Portugal to a poor rural family (or perhaps to a family of minor nobility who had fallen on hard times). Pinto had two brothers and two sisters (and possibly other siblings). In 1551, a brother, Álvaro was recorded in Portuguese Malacca. Letters also record the martyr’s death of a brother in Malacca. In 1557, Francisco Garcia de Vargas, Pinto’s wealthy cousin is recorded in Cochin.

Pinto described his childhood as spartan. In 1521, hoping to improve the boy’s prospects, an uncle took him to Lisbon. There, Pinto was employed in the household  of a noblewoman. After eighteen months or so, Pinto fled. At the docks, he was hired as a ship’s boy on a cargo vessel bound for Setúbal. On the way, French pirates captured the ship and the passengers were set upon the shore at Alentejo.

There is a claim that he might have been related to the wealthy Mendes family who were descendants of Jewish Marranos who lived in Portugal (which makes him a relative of Gracia Mendes Nasi). They had a monopoly of the black pepper commerce in Portugal and some of them later moved to Antwerp in Belgium

Pinto made his way to Setubal, where he entered the service of Francisco de Faria, a knight of Santiago. He remained there for four years and then joined the service of Jorge de Lencastre, a master of the Order of Santiago ( an illegitimate son of King John II of Portugal). Pinto held that position for a number of years. Although comfortable, it held no promise of advancement. Therefore, at twenty-eight, Pinto left to join the Portuguese India Armadas.

Pinto’s travels can be divided into three phases: firstly, from Portugal to India; secondly, through the region of the Red Sea, from the coast of Africa to the Persian Gulf; and thirdly, from east India to Sumatra, Siam, China, and Japan. Finally, Pinto returned to Europe.

Make a Reservation

Tel: (+351) 218 816 600 / (+351) 218 860 431

Email: reservations@palaciobelmonte.com

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